CompTIA Security Plus Mock Test Q563

A user commuting to work via public transport received an offensive image on their smart phone from another commuter. Which of the following attacks MOST likely took place?

A. War chalking
B. Bluejacking
C. War driving
D. Bluesnarfing


Correct Answer: B
Section: Threats and Vulnerabilities

Explanation:
The question states that the ‘attack’ took place on public transport and was received on a smartphone. Therefore, it is most likely that the image was sent using Bluetooth.
Bluejacking is the sending of unsolicited messages over Bluetooth to Bluetooth-enabled devices such as mobile phones, PDAs or laptop computers, sending a vCard which typically contains a message in the name field (i.e., for bluedating or bluechat) to another Bluetooth-enabled device via the OBEX protocol.
Bluetooth has a very limited range, usually around 10 metres (32.8 ft) on mobile phones, but laptops can reach up to 100 metres (328 ft) with powerful (Class 1) transmitters.
Bluejacking is usually harmless, but because bluejacked people generally don’t know what has happened, they may think that their phone is malfunctioning. Usually, a bluejacker will only send a text message, but with modern phones it’s possible to send images or sounds as well. Bluejacking has been used in guerrilla marketing campaigns to promote advergames.

Incorrect Answers:
A: War chalking is the act of making chalk marks on outdoor surfaces (walls, sidewalks, buildings, sign posts, trees) to indicate the existence of an open wireless network connection, usually offering an Internet connection so that others can benefit from the free wireless access. The open connections typically come from the access points of wireless networks located within buildings to serve enterprises. The chalk symbols indicate the type of access point that is available at that specific spot. War chalking is not used to send unsolicited files over Bluetooth.
C: War driving, also called access point mapping, is the act of locating and possibly exploiting connections to wireless local area networks while driving around a city or elsewhere. To do war driving, you need a vehicle, a computer (which can be a laptop), a wireless Ethernet card set to work in promiscuous mode, and some kind of an antenna which can be mounted on top of or positioned inside the car. Because a wireless LAN may have a range that extends beyond an office building, an outside user may be able to intrude into the network, obtain a free Internet connection, and possibly gain access to company records and other resources. War driving is not used to send offensive images over Bluetooth.
D: Bluesnarfing is the theft of information from a wireless device through a Bluetooth connection. Bluetooth is a high-speed but very short-range wireless technology for exchanging data between desktop and mobile computers, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and other devices. By exploiting a vulnerability in the way Bluetooth is implemented on a mobile phone, an attacker can access information — such as the user’s calendar, contact list and e-mail and text messages — without leaving any evidence of the attack. Other devices that use Bluetooth, such as laptop computers, may also be vulnerable, although to a lesser extent, by virtue of their more complex systems. Operating in invisible mode protects some devices, but others are vulnerable as long as Bluetooth is enabled. Bluesnarfing is stealing information over Bluetooth; it is not used to send offensive images to a mobile device.

References:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluejacking
http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/W/warchalking.html
http://searchmobilecomputing.techtarget.com/definition/war-driving
http://searchmobilecomputing.techtarget.com/definition/bluesnarfing