CompTIA Security Plus Mock Test Q1697

Joe, a technician, is working remotely with his company provided laptop at the coffee shop near his home. Joe is concerned that another patron of the coffee shop may be trying to access his laptop. Which of the following is an appropriate control to use to prevent the other patron from accessing Joe’s laptop directly?

A. full-disk encryption
B. Host-based firewall
C. Current antivirus definitions
D. Latest OS updates


Correct Answer: B
Section: Mixed Questions

CompTIA Security Plus Mock Test Q1676

A server administrator needs to administer a server remotely using RDP, but the specified port is closed on the outbound firewall on the network. The access the server using RDP on a port other than the typical registered port for the RDP protocol?

A. TLS
B. MPLS
C. SCP
D. SSH


Correct Answer: A
Section: Mixed Questions

CompTIA Security Plus Mock Test Q536

An investigator recently discovered that an attacker placed a remotely accessible CCTV camera in a public area overlooking several Automatic Teller Machines (ATMs). It is also believed that user accounts belonging to ATM operators may have been compromised. Which of the following attacks has MOST likely taken place?

A. Shoulder surfing
B. Dumpster diving
C. Whaling attack
D. Vishing attack


Correct Answer: A
Section: Threats and Vulnerabilities

Explanation:
The CCTV camera has recorded people entering their PINs in the ATMs. This is known as shoulder surfing.
Shoulder surfing is using direct observation techniques, such as looking over someone’s shoulder, to get information. Shoulder surfing is an effective way to get information in crowded places because it’s relatively easy to stand next to someone and watch as they fill out a form, enter a PIN number at an ATM machine, or use a calling card at a public pay phone.
Shoulder surfing can also be done long distance with the aid of binoculars or other vision-enhancing devices. To prevent shoulder surfing, experts recommend that you shield paperwork or your keypad from view by using your body or cupping your hand.

Incorrect Answers:
B: Dumpster diving is looking for treasure in someone else’s trash. (A dumpster is a large trash container.) In the world of information technology, dumpster diving is a technique used to retrieve information that could be used to carry out an attack on a computer network. Dumpster diving isn’t limited to searching through the trash for obvious treasures like access codes or passwords written down on sticky notes. Seemingly innocent information like a phone list, calendar, or organizational chart can be used to assist an attacker using social engineering techniques to gain access to the network. This is not what is described in this question.
C: Whaling is a specific kind of malicious hacking within the more general category of phishing, which involves hunting for data that can be used by the hacker. In general, phishing efforts are focused on collecting personal data about users. In whaling, the targets are high-ranking bankers, executives or others in powerful positions or job titles. Hackers who engage in whaling often describe these efforts as “reeling in a big fish,” applying a familiar metaphor to the process of scouring technologies for loopholes and opportunities for data theft. Those who are engaged in whaling may, for example, hack into specific networks where these powerful individuals work or store sensitive data. They may also set up keylogging or other malware on a work station associated with one of these executives. There are many ways that hackers can pursue whaling, leading C-level or top-level executives in business and government to stay vigilant about the possibility of cyber threats. This is not what is described in this question.
D: Vishing (voice or VoIP phishing) is an electronic fraud tactic in which individuals are tricked into revealing critical financial or personal information to unauthorized entities. Vishing works like phishing but does not always occur over the Internet and is carried out using voice technology. A vishing attack can be conducted by voice email, VoIP (voice over IP), or landline or cellular telephone.
The potential victim receives a message, often generated by speech synthesis, indicating that suspicious activity has taken place in a credit card account, bank account, mortgage account or other financial service in their name. The victim is told to call a specific telephone number and provide information to “verify identity” or to “ensure that fraud does not occur.” If the attack is carried out by telephone, caller ID spoofing can cause the victim’s set to indicate a legitimate source, such as a bank or a government agency. This is not what is described in this question.

References:
http://searchsecurity.techtarget.com/definition/shoulder-surfing
http://www.techopedia.com/definition/28643/whaling
http://searchunifiedcommunications.techtarget.com/definition/vishing

Comptia Security Plus Mock Test Q31

A company has proprietary mission critical devices connected to their network which are configured remotely by both employees and approved customers. The administrator wants to monitor device security without changing their baseline configuration. Which of the following should be implemented to secure the devices without risking availability?

A. Host-based firewall
B. IDS
C. IPS
D. Honeypot

Correct Answer: B
Section: Network Security

Explanation:
An intrusion detection system (IDS) is a device or software application that monitors network or system activities for malicious activities or policy violations and produces reports to a management station. IDS come in a variety of “flavors” and approach the goal of detecting suspicious traffic in different ways. There are network based (NIDS) and host based (HIDS) intrusion detection systems. Some systems may attempt to stop an intrusion attempt but this is neither required nor expected of a monitoring system. Intrusion detection and prevention systems (IDPS) are primarily focused on identifying possible incidents, logging information about them, and reporting attempts. In addition, organizations use IDPSes for other purposes, such as identifying problems with security policies, documenting existing threats and deterring individuals from violating security policies. IDPSes have become a necessary addition to the security infrastructure of nearly every organization.
IDPSes typically record information related to observed events, notify security administrators of important observed events and produce reports. Many IDPSes can also respond to a detected threat by attempting to prevent it from succeeding. They use several response techniques, which involve the IDPS stopping the attack itself, changing the security environment (e.g. reconfiguring a firewall) or changing the attack’s content.

Incorrect Answers:
A: The question states: The administrator wants to monitor device security without changing their baseline configuration. Installing and configure host-based firewalls would change the
baseline configuration. A host-based or personal software firewall can often limit communications to only approved applications and protocols and can usually prevent externally
initiated connections. It will not monitor device security.

C: The question states: The administrator wants to monitor device security without changing their baseline configuration. The word ‘monitor’ is an important distinction. It doesn’t say
block or prevent. The main functions of intrusion prevention systems are to identify malicious activity, log information about this activity, attempt to block/stop it, and report it. The main
differences are, unlike intrusion detection systems, intrusion prevention systems are placed in-line and are able to actively prevent/block intrusions that are detected.

D: A honeypot is a system whose purpose it is to be attacked. An administrator can watch and study the attack to research current attack methodologies. A honeypot is not used to
monitor device security.

References:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intrusion_detection_system
Stewart, James Michael, CompTIA Security+ Review Guide, Sybex, Indianapolis, 2014, pp. 213, 246
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intrusion_prevention_system